UAS at Puy du Fou


Cinéscénie (pre-UAS)

Today I wanted to write about UAS regulations in other countries, and recent news fit in perfectly with that plan. Puy du Fou, the second largest theme park in France, has announced that it will be including UAS in its nighttime Cinéscénie.  I hadn’t heard about this place until today, but it already looks quite extravagant.  Their webpage about the 3 kg “Neopter” says they are custom created to be waterproof and they can be choreographed together.  The Direction Générale de l’Aviation Civile Française (DGAC) has authorized Puy du Fou to fly the Neopters.

France is clearly more willing to allow UAS use than the United States, and they have set up a tiered system for the weight of the UAS along with the situation in which it is being used.  Even small recreational users must take various safety precautions that are similar to the small UAS regulations proposed by UAS American Fund.  As the weight and proximity to people increases, the users must take more action.  For those who understand French, the regulations are here.  I haven’t been able to find reliable English translations, so rather than go through line-by-line, please email me if you have any questions and I’ll do my best to translate.

Other Countries:

The theme in all of these countries is that small UAS are generally permitted with some limitations, but commercial use is possible without the difficult 333 Exemption process adhered to by the FAA.  I’ve only summarized the requirements, but I hope this gives you a flavor of what other countries are doing – and why R&D is heading there.

Canada: They have a great site that is very user-friendly. There are two general exemptions, one for UAS less than 2 kg and one for those 2-25kg.

  • Less than 2 kg user must:
    • Not have consumed alcohol or be fatigued
    • Familiarize himself with the relevant aeronautical information
    • Perform a site survey
    • Obtain liability insurance
    • Be trained in the system
    • Fly in Class G airspace only
  • There are other various restrictions, similar to the Model Use Guidelines
  • The 2-25 kg exemption is similar, but contains stricter requirements for pilot training and UAS system requirements

United Kingdom:

  • Generally, UAS under 20 kg are exempt from most requirements with the caveats below.  Above that weight, both the aircraft and pilot will need to be certified.
  • No permissions or certifications are required if the UAS is (1) <20 kg, (2) not being used commercially, and (3) not being flown in a congested area.


  • One cannot fly commercially without permission from Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA).
    • Pilots are required to obtain an Operator’s Certificate – not as arduous as the US’s Private Pilot’s License for 333 Exemptions.
    • Documentation must be filed in order to obtain permission to fly from CASA
    • Could revoke Operator’s Certificate if fly without authorization from CASA
  • Recreational
    • Stay 30 meters away from people and avoid crowds
    • Fly below 400 feet
    • Stay within line-of-sight
    • Do not operate within 5 miles of an airport
    • Fines up to $8,500 (Australian) for violation

United Arab Emirates:  I include this because of UAS flying near the airport in Dubai grounded air traffic for almost an hour yesterday.  I couldn’t find the actual regulations, but the official news agency says that one must have permission from the Dubai Civil Aviation Authority in order to use a UAS in Dubai.  There are also strict privacy laws that forbid the taking of another’s picture without their permission.  So do your research before taking aerial photos in Dubai, or anywhere else for that matter.

Also note that in the European Union, a recent case from the Court of Justice of the European Union found that photographs constitute personal data.  Under the EU Data Protection Directive, each country within the EU must pass laws protecting personal data. So even if one is operating a UAS in the GB or in France under the exemptions listed, taking photographs of people in public is still prohibited!


You may also like...

2 Responses

  1. Sue Lincoln says:

    I love the idea of using the drones like this. So surreal.

  2. David Lincoln says:

    Looks like the FCC case got old and no wrong doing

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *